How to buy the best spotlights

LED Spotlights can help provide centered or accent light to your home, but you’ll need a fair few to light space, and if you are using halogen the expenses can really accumulate.

There’s a little bit more to consider when buying spotlights, too, in comparison to conventional lights. From what beam perspective you prefer, to whether you want to help make the move to LED, as well as getting the right color and intensity of light for your spots.

We explain what to look for and how to choose below.

  • Spotlight brightness: Spotlight lighting is measured in ‘useful lumens’, which is just a little dissimilar to how lighting is computed for a conventional bulb.
  • Limelight beam position: The beam position that the truth is defined on the box is defined as the angle at which 50% of the full total useful lumen result comes from the spotlight.

LED vs halogen spotlights

When we surveyed Which? people in May 2014, we found that halogens were still more popular than LED spotlights, with 43% owning halogen spotlights in comparison to 28% owning LED. However, this style appears to be changing with more and much more of you making the switch to LED in large part due to the higher efficiency and lifetime claim that they provide. Below we clarify the pros and cons of every, but for more information, check out our guide to LED lights.

Halogen lights

Halogens are relatively cheap and the light is comparable to an old-style incandescent in conditions of coloring and quality. However, they only last for around 2 years and are far more expensive to run than an LED.

An average LED spotlight appropriate that is on for two hours every day possesses six 50w halogen locations will definitely cost£6 annually to run, more than some refrigerator-freezers that are on all day, every day. Swap the halogens for 7.5w LEDs that produce the same amount of light and it will cost just £6 annually. More details.

How Much Should You Spend on A Spotlight?

You can pick up halogen spotlights for under £1, especially if you get a multipack. LED spotlights to tend to be more expensive, although the costs are dropping on a regular basis, and you could now buy fantastic LED spotlights for under £5 if going for a Best Buy lamp. Again, if you buy in multipacks, you’ll cut costs – plus it’s better to stick to one type where you can prevent compatibility issues as light shade or output can vary between brands and types.

LED Limelight Failures

LED spots to cost more than halogens to buy, so any failures can be hugely annoying and costly to displace. The durability trials have found that most LEDs previous the length, as claimed. If you are having problems with early on LED failures it might well be credited to problems with incompatible dimmer switches or your electrical power setup – so it is worth investigating possible triggers before quitting on LEDs, as there’s a good chance that it is not the LED spotlights that is the problem.

The probabilities are that more mature dimmers won’t work with LEDs and will even cause some LEDs that say they are dimmer-switch appropriate to break. So, it’s worth looking at with an electrician or contacting the bulb manufacturer to ensure you hold the right dimmer transition for your LED spotlights. Learn more details at:  http://www.larsonelectronics.com/c-603-temporary-construction-lights.aspx

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